Exploring Lil Uzi Vert’s Music (Editorial)

 

You may have noticed I am a fan of Lil Uzi Vert. He grabbed my attention when I first saw the music video for Uzi off his 2014 Don Cannon hosted tape. He continued to impress as each new project was released with much anticipation. I enjoyed The Real Uzi, mostly more than almost all of his other mixtapes. His simple flow and straight-forward lyrics are more enjoyable, full of emphasis and emotion. The production from Metro Boomin, Don Cannon, and Maaly Raw (to name a few) is incredible. Uzi’s later work has been progressive, using more of the 2016 sound.

He’s come into his own post The Real Uzi, with a more unique approach to songs, but this does not always create better tracks. It makes sense that he’s garnered more fans due to this new sound, but for earlier fans this may have been quite a turn for the worse. Uzi’s chemistry with Charlie Heat, who produced almost all of the first half of The Real Uzi, is amazing. These two create bangers. While I enjoyed this project more, I love Luv Is Rage and The Perfect Luv.

Uzi is a very appealing artist due to his versatility and his ability to consistently change his sound and make it work. When the focus is on Uzi we get full cohesive tracks and albums, but it is important to note his features. One of the most notable is Stamina off of Moosh & Twist’s newest album Growing Pains. Uzi is featured on a host of hot artists projects; everywhere from Future’s E.T., A$AP Ferg’s Always Strive and Prosper, Slime Season, and Coloring Book. One of the most effective “posse” cuts is on DJ Drama’s newest LP titled Camera. Uzi teams up with 1st FKi, Post Malone and Mac Miller to create a dark and deep track that is ever pervasive. Slinky and slippery, each artist holds their own, but it is Uzi’s vocals that really make the track what it is.

Uzi has a knack for putting out just the right amount of full LP’s and features, creating a demand for more music, but delivering to stay relevant. He doesn’t just work with anyone; it seems to be only artists that he connects with and respects. There isn’t a lack of material to revisit, and that’s what keeps me coming back.